Pressure Canning Dried Beans

February 10, 2019

In the winter every now and then I enjoy doing a large homestead project. We live in some very cold tundra, therefore hanging outside for long amounts of time is not an option for me. That's why homestead projects take place inside the house in the winter. Besides, I am always trying to hibernate every winter. I don't like feeling lazy or bored. What is the solution? Hauling out the canner and washing up some jars!

 Our family of seven goes through plenty of food. I like cheap and convenient food. That being said, I refuse to buy food with weird Frankenstein chemicals in it and I don't like dropping a lot of money off at the grocery store. How is a family supposed to save money but have high quality, cheap and convenient food that doesn't cost an arm and a leg? A pressure canner could help you and yours relieve some financial pressure! Pun intended! Ha!

 

 

This past week, my goal was to run the canner once a day for at least 6 days. 7 quarts fit into a canner. 6 days times 7 quarts equals 42 quarts of food. Oh Yeah! That's what I'm talking about!

 

Did I meet my goal? Yes, I did. Thanks for asking!

 

How much would 42 quarts of canned beans cost if I were to buy them at the grocery store? (Each quart has approximately 2 cups of cooked beans) I priced out a small can of Bushes Black Beans at Walmart. One can cost 1.58. I don't have a Walmart within a couple hours so I would be spending more than that at my local grocery store. Dried Beans are quite reasonably priced especially if you can find a bulk source.

 

The bonus is: I know the ingredients that I have put in. (Water, salt and beans.) Read on if you want to learn more.

 

My method of canning dried beans is pretty simple. I don't soak the beans because they ended up being too mushy when I did. I have canned dried beans for many years and this is the best way that I have found. When you put one cup of beans in a quart, there is plenty of room for them to expand. And dried beans expand when they are in liquid.

Warm up all your jars with hot (not boiling water) before you begin, dump the water out before you begin filling each jar with beans. Put one scant measuring cup of beans in each warm clean quart jar. Put in 1 teaspoon of salt. I like to use pink Himalayan salt. Salt is optional. Add very hot water to each jar. Remember don't add boiling water to a cool jar, your jars could crack and break. Very sad...

 

Leave one inch of headspace for your jars. Headspace means the space that is left at the top of your jars. Add your lids and rings. Rings should be snug.

 

Put 2 quarts of very warm water into your pressure canner. Put jars in. This is the point where if you have never pressure canned and have no clue what you are doing, READ THE MANUAL! Sorry, I didn't mean to yell! ;)

 

Bring canner up to 10 pounds of pressure for 90 minutes. Wash some dishes while you keep your eyes on the canner. 

 

Bring the pressure down, let cool for about half an hour or so, take out jars and admire your canned beans. Imagine how great they will taste and how they will help you save money! Every time I open my canner full of freshly canned food, I feel so thankful to be able to provide for my family. Happy Canning!!!

 

Disclaimer: If this will be your first project with a pressure canner, make sure you read the basics on how to operate a pressure canner. The modern canners are very safe and

easy to use, but it is very smart to know the basics. The more you know, the easier it is to operate this very useful homestead tool!

 

 

 

Here's a verse for you!

She sets about her work vigorously; her arms are strong for her tasks. Proverbs 31:17

 

 

 

 

 

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